Medicine

Academic Medicine Needs More Women Leaders

Editor’s note: The opinions expressed by the author do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the AAMC or its members.

This year, for the first time, more women than men entered medical school, an impressive advance from a few decades ago when women represented less than a third of matriculants. Yet progress in another key segment of academic medicine has been painfully slow. The number of women in C-suite positions and other high-level posts—chief medical officer, chief financial officer, department chair, and dean, for example—remains shockingly low. Given how much we need women in leadership roles, it is time to act. I urge sponsorship of women, an approach borrowed from the corporate world that can elevate a person from unknown talent to rising-star status.

The need is clear. In a 2013 Academic Medicine article, my colleagues and I wrote on the poor representation of women in leadership roles, citing AAMC

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Visualizing Speech-Generated Oral Fluid Droplets with Laser Light Scattering

To the Editor:

Video

Digital Object ThumbnailLaser Light-Scattering Experiment Showing Speech-Generated Droplets. (00:42)

Aerosols and droplets generated during speech have been implicated in the person-to-person transmission of viruses,1,2 and there is current interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the spread of Covid-19 by these means. The act of speaking generates oral fluid droplets that vary widely in size,1 and these droplets can harbor infectious virus particles. Whereas large droplets fall quickly to the ground, small droplets can dehydrate and linger as “droplet nuclei” in the air, where they behave like an aerosol and thereby expand the spatial extent of emitted infectious particles.2 We report the results of a laser light-scattering experiment in which speech-generated droplets and their trajectories were visualized.

The output from a 532-nm green laser operating at 2.5-W optical power was transformed into a light sheet that was approximately 1 mm thick and 150 mm tall.

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Herbal Medicine Courses from CNM

Herbal Medicine Diploma – Syllabus

Plant identification in Herbal Medicine Course

Part 1:

Biomedicine, Naturopathy Study & Herbal Medicine I

Biomedicine

  • Anatomy, physiology, pathology
  • Infectious diseases, oncology
  • Clinical diagnostic, differential diagnosis
  • Examination methods
  • Laboratory, pharmacology
  • Red flag symptoms
  • Drug interactions

Naturopathy Study

  • Naturopathy
  • TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine)
  • Naturopathic Nutrition
  • First Aid Homeopathy
  • Introduction to Herbal Medicine
  • Iridology incl. clinics

Herbal Medicine I

  • History, philosophy and treatment theories of Western herbal medicine
  • Herbal actions and their therapeutic applications
  • Safety considerations for herbal medicine
  • Social, political and legal context for herbal practice
  • Plant anatomy and physiology
  • Basic horticulture
  • Ecological issues and sustainability in herbal medicine
  • Energetics (Greco-Roman, Ayurveda, Traditional Chinese Medicine, American traditions)
  • Clinical Observation
  • Practitioner Development & Ethics I
  • Research & study skills I
Naturopathy

Part 2:

Naturopathic Principles & Herbal Medicine II

Naturopathic Principles

  • Naturopathy & Detoxification
  • Bach Flower Therapy
  • Tissue Salts
  • Bodywork (Acupressure, Reflex therapies)

Herbal Medicine II

  • Biochemistry
  • Pharmacology
  • Herb drug interactions
  • Botany & Plant
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List of Anxiety Medications (53 Compared)

Anxiety is an emotion characterized by feelings of tension, worried thoughts, and accompanied by physical symptoms such as sweating, trembling, voice changes, or increased blood pressure. It may also be called nervousness.

Occasional anxiety concerning a stressful or uncomfortable event is normal. However, if a person feels disproportionate levels of anxiety or it is present almost continuously, it might be diagnosed as an anxiety disorder. 

What Causes Anxiety?

Anxiety is part of our survival response and is the way our body responds to potentially harmful or worrying triggers.

Strong emotions or fear cause a surge of epinephrine (also called adrenaline) from our adrenal glands. This increases our heartbeat, increases our sensitivity to our surroundings, and prepares us for physical confrontation or to flee if we perceive any threats to our safety. This is often called the fight or flight response.

Anxieties today mostly revolve around family, friends, health, money, or

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List of Diabetes, Type 2 Medications (161 Compared)

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes and is characterized by high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Although some symptoms may be similar, it is a different condition to type 1 diabetes.

Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, most people with type 2 diabetes still produce insulin. However, it is either not enough to deal with all the glucose that is in their blood or their cells are unable to recognize the insulin and use it properly (this is called insulin resistance).

Type 2 diabetes usually affects people who are middle-aged or older, and obesity is by far the biggest risk factor. In the past two decades, the condition has become more prevalent in younger people, including children, mainly because of the rising rates of obesity in children. People who do little exercise or of certain ethnicities (such as Native Americans, African-Americans, and Hispanics) are

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Gabapentin: Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Warnings

Generic Name: gabapentin (GA ba PEN tin)
Brand Names: Gralise, Horizant, Neurontin, Gabarone

Medically reviewed by Kaci Durbin, MD Last updated on Jun 7, 2020.

What is gabapentin?

Gabapentin is an anti-epileptic drug, also called an anticonvulsant. It affects chemicals and nerves in the body that are involved in the cause of seizures and some types of pain.

Gabapentin is used together with other medicines to treat partial seizures in adults and children at least 3 years old.

Gabapentin is also used to treat neuropathic pain (nerve pain) caused by herpes virus or shingles (herpes zoster) in adults.

Use only the brand and form of gabapentin your doctor has prescribed. Check your medicine each time you get a refill to make sure you receive the correct form.

The Gralise brand of gabapentin is indicated for the management of neuropathic pain only. It is not used for epilepsy.

Horizant is used

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Amlodipine: Drug Uses, Side Effects & Dosage

Generic Name: amlodipine (am LOE di peen)
Brand Names: Katerzia, Norvasc

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Dec 1, 2019.

What is amlodipine?

Amlodipine is a calcium channel blocker that dilates (widens) blood vessels and improves blood flow.

Amlodipine is used to treat chest pain (angina) and other conditions caused by coronary artery disease.

Amlodipine is also used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). Lowering blood pressure may lower your risk of a stroke or heart attack.

Amlodipine is for use in adults and children who are at least 6 years old.

Important information

Before taking amlodipine, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure or liver disease.

Drinking alcohol can further lower your blood pressure and may increase certain side effects of amlodipine.

If you are being treated for high blood pressure, keep using amlodipine even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has

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Cardiovascular Medicine | Cleveland Clinic

Overview

About the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine

Cleveland Clinic’s Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute is a leader in the heart field. Its long history of innovations, from the first cardiac catheterization to new diagnostic imaging approaches and treatments for heart disease – provides a legacy of excellence in patient care, research and education.

Cleveland Clinic’s Tomsich Family Department of Cardiovascular Medicine has physicians in every cardiovascular specialty working to offer the latest medications and interventional heart disease procedures. The end result — better heart care outcomes for our patients.

Why choose Cleveland Clinic for your care?

Our outcomes speak for themselves. Please review our facts and figures and if you have any questions don’t hesitate to ask.

Cardiovascular Specialties

Cleveland Clinic’s Tomsich Family Department of Cardiovascular Medicine has physicians in every cardiovascular specialty working to offer the latest medications and interventional

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The American Academy of Oral Medicine