COVID19

Going to the Dentist During Covid-19: 10 Hygienist Tips

Dentists and Covid-19

Since the Covid-19 pandemic started, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association have asked dentists to forego routine and elective procedures in favor of emergency situations. This helped minimize the risk of infection to patients and staff and reduced the demand for personal protective equipment (PPE); dentists do, after all, have to get up close and personal to do their job.

Now, along with other establishments, some dental offices may be opening up for more routine procedures—the cavity that needs filling, or the cleaning you’ve been putting off. With contact comes the risk of Covid-19. “There are always risks because the coronavirus is highly infectious,” says registered dental hygienist JoAnn Gurenlian, PhD, chair for the American Dental Hygienists Association’s (ADHA) Task Force on Return to Work.

So, when should you schedule your dentist appointment? These tips will help you decide when

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Is it safe to go to the dentist right now? New safeguards help make routine dental checkups safe during COVID-19 pandemic

GLENDALE, Calif. (KABC) — Like every small business, dentists have been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic. But with new guidelines issued just days ago, dentists can start seeing routine patients again, with several solutions in place to help make your next checkup safe. These protocols include a temperature check, mandatory hand sanitizer and a checklist of health questions.

These safeguards are just some of the new guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Their release gave dentists and other dental specialists in California the “yellow light” to see patients who have been forced to delay much needed care.

The fear of contracting COVID-19 is not only on the minds of patients, but very much a concern for dentists and their staff.

MORE: Where did COVID-19 come from?

“Anything that we can do in our practices right now to reduce the aerosol levels, that’s our goal,” said Dr.

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A Dentist And A Hygienist Describe How COVID-19 Disrupts Even Routine Teeth Cleanings | KCUR 89.3

Dental offices across Kansas closed for more than a month to make sure they weren’t using up critical personal protective equipment needed at hospitals.

Now many are beginning to clean molars and bicuspids again.

Brian Grimmett of the Kansas News Service spoke with David Lawlor, a dentist, and Julie Martin, the president of the Kansas Dental Hygienists’ Association, to find out what you can expect when you go and how they’re trying to keep patients and employees safe.


The interviews were performed separately. The questions and answers have been edited for brevity and clarity.


Kansas News Service: What are the expectations for getting back up and running?

David Lawlor: We’ve been pushing patients back for six weeks. I think at first people originally we’re trying to do their best to deal with it. If it’s something I can put off for a while I will. But

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Responding to COVID-19 | PA.GOV

On May 4, 2020, Governor Wolf provided guidance that details procedures businesses must follow to conduct in-person operations in counties that move to the yellow phase of reopening.

All businesses, including non-profits, permitted to conduct in-person operations are subject to this guidance. This guidance is based on the building safety and business safety orders, under which nearly all life-sustaining businesses have been operating during the red phase.

Under the yellow phase of reopening, life-sustaining businesses that could not conduct either all or part of their operations via telework will continue to conduct their operations in-person, and many non-life-sustaining businesses will be permitted to restart their in-person operations through the loosening of some restrictions under the stay-at-home and business closure orders.

Protecting Employees

All businesses that have been conducting their operations in whole or in part remotely through individual teleworking must continue telework operations for each of those employees.

All businesses

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Los Angeles Surge Hospital to Begin Accepting COVID-19 Patients

Facility opening on the campus of the former St. Vincent Medical Center in Los Angeles

Video of Los Angeles Surge Hospital

SACRAMENTO – A new COVID-19 treatment center
in the former St. Vincent Medical Center will begin accepting COVID-19 transfer
patients from other hospitals in the region on April 13. The facility will
increase capacity in phases with a maximum capacity of 266
beds. California is leasing the medical center to expand the capacity of the
health care delivery system to prepare for a potential surge in COVID-19 cases.

“California continues to prepare our health care delivery
system for a potential surge in COVID-19 patients. I am grateful that the
County of Los Angeles, Dignity Health and Kaiser Permanente have joined us in
this effort.” said Governor Gavin Newsom.

“This unprecedented public private partnership between the
State of California, the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services,
Dignity Health, and

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How COVID-19 will change North Carolina dental practices

Listen to our daily briefing:

Your next dental appointment will look and feel very different. That’s if you even choose to schedule a dentist appointment.

The novel coronavirus pandemic has changed everything about daily life. But the nature of dentistry — probing in people’s mouths, the high volume of patients seen daily, the potential for spreading germs through the air and on surfaces — has impacted that industry to an extent that a routine cleaning and exam night never be the same again, according to the head of North Carolina’s dental society.

While dentistry was considered an essential business under N.C. Gov. Roy Cooper’s stay-at-home order, complications including the unprecedented demand for masks, face shields and gowns caused most dentists to cut services or close temporarily.

Figuring out how dentistry will look in the new normal worries some in the profession.

“We’re driving down a dark road and we don’t

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UChicago Medicine doctors see ‘remarkable’ success using ventilator alternatives to treat COVID-19

Newswise — Doctors at the University of Chicago Medicine are seeing “truly remarkable” results using high-flow nasal cannulas rather than ventilators and intubation to treat some COVID-19 patients.

High-flow nasal cannulas, or HFNCs, are non-invasive nasal prongs that sit below the nostrils and blow large volumes of warm, humidified oxygen into the nose and lungs.

A team from UChicago Medicine’s emergency room took 24 COVID-19 patients who were in respiratory distress and gave them HFNCs instead of putting them on ventilators. The patients all fared extremely well, and only one of them required intubation after 10 days.

“The success we’ve had has been truly remarkable,” said Michael O’Connor, MD, Director of Critical Care Medicine.

The HFNCs are often combined with prone positioning, a technique where patients lay on their stomachs to aid breathing. Together, they’ve helped UChicago Medicine doctors avoid dozens of intubations and have decreased the chances of bad

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FitnessAI Unveils Home Workout Features to Meet COVID-19 Fitness Needs


FitnessAI





Tuesday, May 5, 2020 9:30 AM

NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / May 5, 2020 / Today, FitnessAI, the app that uses AI to generate personalized workout plans, has officially rolled out several new features to meet the swelling market demand for at-home fitness applications and equipment during the COVID-19 quarantine.

“FitnessAI is traditionally a strength training app meant for the gym,” details FitnessAI Founder, Jake Mor. “Since gyms are closed, we decided to shift our attention to home workout plans that require absolutely no equipment. Specifically, we’re focusing on two cardio offerings: Home Workouts and The Daily Class.”

FitnessAI is known for its emphasis on strength training, which tailors workouts for users based on their goals. Mor’s algorithm optimizes sets, weights, and reps for optimal muscle growth based on a dataset of more than 6 million workouts from his previous app, Lift Log.

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Czech hospital hit by cyberattack while in the midst of a COVID-19 outbreak

brno-hospital.jpg

Image via Google Street View

The Brno University Hospital in the city of Brno, Czech Republic, has been hit by a cyberattack right in the middle of a COVID-19 outbreak that is picking up steam in the small central European country.

Hospital officials have not revealed the nature of the security breach; however, the incident was deemed severe enough to postpone urgent surgical interventions, and re-route new acute patients to nearby St. Anne’s University Hospital, local media reported.

The hospital was forced to shut down its entire IT network during the incident, and two of the hospital’s other branches, the Children’s Hospital and the Maternity Hospital, were also impacted.

The infection took root at around 5 a.m. in the morning, local time, Peter Gramantik, a patient in the hospital at the time, and a security researcher with Sucuri told ZDNet via email today.

“The hospital public announcement system started to

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