History

hospital | Definition, History, Types, Services, & Facts

Hospital, an institution that is built, staffed, and equipped for the diagnosis of disease; for the treatment, both medical and surgical, of the sick and the injured; and for their housing during this process. The modern hospital also often serves as a centre for investigation and for teaching.

To better serve the wide-ranging needs of the community, the modern hospital has often developed outpatient facilities, as well as emergency, psychiatric, and rehabilitation services. In addition, “bedless hospitals” provide strictly ambulatory (outpatient) care and day surgery. Patients arrive at the facility for short appointments. They may also stay for treatment in surgical or medical units for part of a day or for a full day, after which they are discharged for follow-up by a primary care health provider.

Hospitals have long existed in most countries. Developing countries, which contain

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The History of Medicine: 7 Surprising Facts

Maintaining a comfortable state of health is a goal shared by much of the world’s population past and present, thus the history of health and medicine weaves a thread connecting us with our ancestors’ human experiences. Yet it’s easy to assume that studying it involves either celebrating the ‘eureka moments’ of well-known heroes or laughing at outdated therapies. But, as I set out to show in my book, The History of Medicine in 100 Facts (Amberley Publishing, 2015), medicine’s past features plenty of lesser-known but equally fascinating episodes…

1

Some of the earliest named doctors were women

Saqqara is a huge archaeological site about 20 miles south of present-day Cairo. Five millennia ago it was the necropolis for the ancient Egyptian city of Memphis, and remains home to one of the oldest surviving buildings in the world – the step pyramid of Djoser.

A nearby tomb reveals the image of

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Local History: First female dentist in Lackwanna County was destined for job – News

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Photo: N/A, License: N/A, Created: 2020:04:17 14:01:05

TIMES-TRIBUNE ARCHIVES Dr. Elsie Cole, retiring president of the Scranton District Dental Society, turns over the gavel to Dr. Frank B. Gardner, 1954 president, at the election and installation dinner on Dec. 14, 1953, at the Hotel Jermyn. From left: Gardner, Cole, Dr. Joseph Newman, Dr. John C. Specker and Dr. C.W. Taylor.


From the time she was 5 years old, helping her father count supplies and prepare gold for fillings, Elsie Cole was destined to become the first female dentist in Lackawanna County.


Born in Scranton in 1892, she was determined to follow in the footsteps of her father, P.F. Struppler, who had a dental practice in West Side. She attended the School of Lackawanna and then Temple School of Dentistry, where she met Jesse Cole, another dental student who would become her husband. They married in 1914, a year after they graduated.


Soon,

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The Medici Family – HISTORY

Contents

  1. Birth of the Medici Dynasty
  2. The Descendants of Cosimo de’ Medici
  3. A New Medici Branch Comes to Power
  4. The Medici Dynasty in Decline

The Medici family, also known as the House of Medici, first attained wealth and political power in Florence in the 13th century through its success in commerce and banking. Beginning in 1434 with the rise to power of Cosimo de’ Medici (or Cosimo the Elder), the family’s support of the arts and humanities made Florence into the cradle of the Renaissance, a cultural flowering rivaled only by that of ancient Greece. The Medicis produced four popes (Leo X, Clement VII, Pius IV and Leo XI), and their genes have been mixed into many of Europe’s royal families. The last Medici ruler died without a male heir in 1737, ending the family dynasty after almost three centuries.

Birth of the Medici Dynasty

The Medici story began around

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history of medicine | History & Facts

Early medicine and folklore

Unwritten history is not easy to interpret, and, although much may be learned from a study of the drawings, bony remains, and surgical tools of early humans, it is difficult to reconstruct their mental attitude toward the problems of disease and death. It seems probable that, as soon as they reached the stage of reasoning, they discovered by the process of trial and error which plants might be used as foods, which of them were poisonous, and which of them had some medicinal value. Folk medicine or domestic medicine, consisting largely in the use of vegetable products, or herbs, originated in this fashion and still persists.

But that is not the whole story. Humans did not at first regard death and disease as natural phenomena. Common maladies, such as colds or constipation, were accepted as part of existence and dealt with by means of such herbal

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History of medicine – Wikipedia

The history of medicine shows how societies have changed in their approach to illness and disease from ancient times to the present. Early medical traditions include those of Babylon, China, Egypt and India. Sushruta, from India, introduced the concepts of medical diagnosis and prognosis. The Hippocratic Oath was written in ancient Greece in the 5th century BCE, and is a direct inspiration for oaths of office that physicians swear upon entry into the profession today. In the Middle Ages, surgical practices inherited from the ancient masters were improved and then systematized in Rogerius’s The Practice of Surgery. Universities began systematic training of physicians around 1220 CE in Italy.

Invention of the microscope was a consequence of improved understanding, during the Renaissance. Prior to the 19th century, humorism (also known as humoralism) was thought to explain the cause of disease but it was gradually replaced by the germ theory of

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Collections: Images from the History of Medicine (IHM) – Digital Collections

Collections: Images from the History of Medicine (IHM) – Digital Collections – National Library of Medicine Search Results

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Pennsylvania Hospital History: Stories – Nation’s First Hospital

The Story of the
Creation of the Nation’s First Hospital

Pennsylvania Hospital was founded in 1751 by Dr. Thomas Bond
and Benjamin Franklin “to care for the sick-poor and insane
who were wandering the streets of Philadelphia.” At the
time, Philadelphia was the fastest growing city in the 13 colonies.
In 1730, the population numbered 11,500 and had grown to 15,000
by 1750 (the city continued to grow and by 1776, its 40,000 residents
made Philadelphia the second largest English-speaking city in
the British Empire).

The docks and wharves along the Delaware River teemed with activity
as ships bound for foreign ports loaded up with flour, meat and
lumber while overseas vessels delivered European-manufactured
goods and wines. Foreign visitors noted with envy the city’s
growing prosperity. Although the majority of the population was
neither extremely wealthy nor extremely poor, there was a significant
increase in the number

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Islamic Medicine – History of Medicine

One of these important fields was Islamic medicine, which saw medical practice begin to resemble our modern systems. Certainly, this period of the history of medicine was centuries ahead of Europe, still embedded in the Dark Ages.

Central to Islamic medicine was belief in the Qur’an and Hadiths, which stated that Muslims had a duty to care for the sick and this was often referred to as “Medicine of the Prophet.” According to the sayings of the Prophet Muhammed, he believed that Allah had sent a cure for every ailment and that it was the duty of Muslims to take care of the body and spirit. This certainly falls under the remit of improving the quality of healthcare and ensuring that there is access for all, with many of the Hadiths laying down guidelines for a holistic approach to health.

Initially, in the early days of Islam, there was some

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