Pandemic

How to safely go to the dentist during the pandemic

My tongue first detected the problem when it caught a sharp edge on my teeth: A hefty hunk of my back right molar was missing. I’m not sure how it happened, but it meant that after months of avoiding any sort of physical closeness with other people, I needed to brave the dentist’s chair.

With the pandemic raging across the United States, the office I entered in Alexandria, Virginia, looked very different from the one I had visited months before. Two cups of pens sat on the receptionist’s desk, one for “clean” writing utensils and the other for those recently used. A plexiglass partition divided me from the rest of the office behind, and everyone—myself included—donned a mask.

Dental work is a uniquely risky environment for spreading SARS-CoV-2, since medical practitioners work face-to-face with open-mouthed patients for extended periods of time. “We, unfortunately, work in a danger zone,” says Mark

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The Pandemic and the Dentist

On March 16, the ADA issued the following statement:

“The American Dental Association recognizes the unprecedented and extraordinary circumstances dentists and all health care professionals face related to growing concern about COVID-19. The ADA is deeply concerned for the health and well-being of the public and the dental team. In order for dentistry to do its part to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, the ADA recommends dentists nationwide postpone elective procedures for the next three weeks. Concentrating on emergency dental care will allow us to care for our emergency patients and alleviate the burden that dental emergencies would place on hospital emergency departments.”

“As health care professionals, it is up to dentists to make well-informed decisions about their patients and practices.”

Various local dental societies have issued statements echoing these recommendations. It is unlikely that these limitations would be lifted soon.

Coronavirus has a global reach, is in over 200

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A visit to the dentist will get expensive. But is it safe to book an appointment during the pandemic?

WASHINGTON: Is it safe to visit the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic? Dentists can’t eliminate all risk, but they are taking steps to minimize the chances of spreading the coronavirus.

You’ll likely notice changes as soon as you enter the office. Many dentists have removed magazines from waiting rooms, for example, as well as some chairs to encourage social distancing.

They also are spacing out appointments to avoid crowding their offices.

You may be asked to arrive for your appointment with a facial covering and to wait in your car until equipment is cleaned and the dentist is ready. Before receiving care, you can also expect staff to take your temperature and ask about COVID-19 symptoms.

Procedures are changing, too.

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Some dentists are charging for all the extra gear, so ask in advance if you should expect extra costs.

Coronavirus is spread mainly through droplets people spray when

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Is it safe to go to the dentist right now? New safeguards help make routine dental checkups safe during COVID-19 pandemic

GLENDALE, Calif. (KABC) — Like every small business, dentists have been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic. But with new guidelines issued just days ago, dentists can start seeing routine patients again, with several solutions in place to help make your next checkup safe. These protocols include a temperature check, mandatory hand sanitizer and a checklist of health questions.

These safeguards are just some of the new guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Their release gave dentists and other dental specialists in California the “yellow light” to see patients who have been forced to delay much needed care.

The fear of contracting COVID-19 is not only on the minds of patients, but very much a concern for dentists and their staff.

MORE: Where did COVID-19 come from?

“Anything that we can do in our practices right now to reduce the aerosol levels, that’s our goal,” said Dr.

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Florida braces for presidential primary amid a health pandemic

Since the novel coronavirus outbreak was declared a pandemic on Wednesday, state election officials have made a number of changes, from relocating polling sites to encouraging more early voting, to protect the health of the state’s 4 million people who are over the age of 65 and represent one-fifth of the total population of the state.

“Our recommendation would be if there’s a polling location in assisted living facility, allow the residents to vote there,” Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said at a press conference on Wednesday. “But maybe the general public should have the option or be directed to go to a different polling location.”

Some of the changes being implemented by election officials across the state include relocating polling sites away from assisted living senior communities.

Hillsborough County, on the west coast of the state, immediately announced changes to polling locations that were set to be at large assisted

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Getting to the dentist during a pandemic

“I was having some pain,” she said. “With the pandemic I said, ‘I’ll just have to wait until everything’s over.'”

That Sunday, though, the pain became extreme. When she found a dentist who could see her, she learned she needed an emergency root canal.

As part of the country’s response to the Covid-19 crisis, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that dentists put off “elective procedures, surgeries and non-urgent dental visits,” allowing only emergency visits until the threat subsides.

That’s because dental work could place dentists and dental hygienists at risk for Covid-19 infection, according to the US Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

The government agency includes dental health-care providers in the “very high exposure risk” category. Routine dental tools such as air-water syringes can send droplets of saliva through the air, potentially carrying the virus with them. Even recommended personal
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Your Guide To Moving During The Coronavirus Pandemic

Most of the country is holed up at home right now because of the coronavirus pandemic, but some people are choosing to relocate. It might seem like a tricky prospect to move during a global health crisis, but there are some compelling reasons to do it now.

For one, many Americans now realize that their current financial situation won’t support their current rent or mortgage payments, especially if they have lost income because of the pandemic and lockdown. They may find it necessary to downsize or move to an area with a lower cost of living.

There are nonfinancial reasons, too. “As people are spending more and more time in their current homes, they are realizing they may not be living exactly where they want to be in the next chapter of their lives,” said Marisela Cotilla, executive director of sales for ALINA Residences in Boca Raton, Florida.

Of course,

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