visits

Visits to the dentist can evoke memories of traumatic sexual abuse

dentist
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

The defencelessness experienced while sitting in the dentist’s chair can prompt memories of sexual abuse, finds endodontist Eva Wolf in her new study.

She has interviewed 13 people, who had such experiences, and found many are scared and avoid going to the dentist, do not show up for scheduled appointments, or leave ongoing treatment.

“It is very clear that the situation at the dentist is reminiscent of abuse previously experienced. It is the same defencelessness and powerlessness that arises in situations of abuse. By recognizing these reactions, dental care can contribute to the disclosure of abuse,” says Wolf, associate professor of endodontics at Malmö University.

She points out that dental education and dental hygienist education are among the programs that, according to the Swedish Higher Education Ordinance, must educate students about men’s violence against women, and violence in close relationships.

“Healthcare professionals must be attentive and

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Avoid dental cleanings and other routine visits to the dentist for now

You should delay your routine dental cleaning until the coronavirus pandemic eases, according to new guidance from the World Health Organization. Dentists, hygienists, and other oral care providers have a heightened risk of contracting COVID-19 and passing it to patients because “they are in close contact with their patients’ mouths, use spray-generating equipment that produces airborne particles, [and] are exposed to saliva, blood and body fluids,” WHO said.

“WHO advises that routine non-essential oral health care—such as check-ups, dental cleanings, and preventive care—be delayed until there has been sufficient reduction in COVID-19 transmission rates,” the U.N. agency said.

Almost three-quarters of countries surveyed said that the coronavirus pandemic has disrupted dental services—higher than for any other type of essential service,

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Maine dentist visits will look different as offices reopen

Starting Monday, going to the dentist will look a little different. Before you arrive, in many cases, you’ll have to fill out an online form. Then when you arrive you’ll have to answer these four questions, and then you will be met by an office worker to take your temperature. “Today is an optional reopening for dental practices, it is not mandatory,” Dr. Brad Rand said. As the reopening process starts, Rand said safety is the main priority. “There is a difference between being safe and feeling safe, you can be one or both,” Rand said. “I would say that patients are going to be safe at your dental offices.” Many offices WMTW News 8 spoke with who were open told us they were booked up with appointments, while others are staying closed and are only opened for emergencies. But a visit to the dentist’s office won’t look quite like … Read More

Local dentist researchers technology to help make office visits safer in time of COVID

Oral health can be a concern for people who are sheltering at home.

Dentistry is defined by close contact with patients, and distancing in the era of COVID-19 poses new challenges.

From the air down to the water, a local doctor is bringing high tech infection control to his neighborhood office.

When news of the virus shutting down China made its way to the U.S, Dr Michael Czarkowski sunk his teeth deep into research.

“We’ve got to come up with a plan and I’m a pro-active person so I tried to figure out what do I have to do in my practice to protect my patients, my team and my family,” he said.

The dentist who typically sees 80 to 100 patients a week now sees about five for emergency procedures only.

And with worries about COVID-19, the phone isn’t exactly ringing off the hook.

“I can just tell some

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