Medicine – Scientific American

Rose Blan

Many hospitalized victims are developing potentially lethal secondary co-infections such as bacterial pneumonia and sepsis Numerous contenders—from a controversial malaria medication to treatments that regulate the immune system—are now in clinical trials April 16, 2020 — Tanya Lewis In mice, a test for lung cancer involves nanoprobes that recognize tumors […]

Many hospitalized victims are developing potentially lethal secondary co-infections such as bacterial pneumonia and sepsis

Numerous contenders—from a controversial malaria medication to treatments that regulate the immune system—are now in clinical trials

April 16, 2020 — Tanya Lewis

In mice, a test for lung cancer involves nanoprobes that recognize tumors and send reporter molecules into the urine for simple analysis.

April 15, 2020 — W. Wayt Gibbs

A new era for Alzheimer’s and journalism in the time of coronavirus 

April 14, 2020 — Curtis Brainard

Originally published in June 1954

April 13, 2020

Slated for human trials, EIDD-2801 could become the first pill for COVID-19

April 7, 2020 — Michael Waldholz

Originally published in June 1868

April 7, 2020

Fighting the disease is like trying to hit a moving target, evolutionarily speaking

From online journal clubs to “tweetorials” to conference updates, social media is changing the dissemination and discussion of biomedicine

April 1, 2020 — Nicole Wetsman and Nature Medicine

In mice, these white blood cells tamp down inflammation in the lungs

March 27, 2020 — Esther Landhuis

As the Covid-19 pandemic overwhelms hospitals and shuts down American cities, it has also placed new demands on janitors and specialized cleaners. In New York City, it’s Reuven Noyman’s job to clean up after the coronavirus…

March 27, 2020 — Jeffery DelViscio

Turning from bedbugs and carpet-eating moths to COVID-19, an industrial cleaner joins the coronavirus fight…

March 27, 2020 — Michael Schulson and Undark

Five questions are answered about a promising yet problematic and unproved use for an antimalarial drug

March 27, 2020 — Katherine Seley-Radtke and The Conversation US

In part, it means that you need to look beyond the patient’s chart

A team at Boston Children’s Hospital is searching for ways to boost a vaccine’s effectiveness for those who need it most

March 26, 2020 — Karen Weintraub

New York City researchers hope antibody-rich plasma can keep people out of intensive care

March 25, 2020 — Amy Maxmen and Nature magazine

Life’s master molecule has been transformed into therapies that tackle the roots of human illness

March 25, 2020

A long-disdained therapy that targets RNA is suddenly achieving spectacular success

March 23, 2020 — Lydia Denworth

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, remote medical consultation seems like a no-brainer—but it’s not that simple

Some experts warn that accelerated testing will involve risky trade-offs

March 20, 2020 — Ewen Callaway and Nature magazine

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History of medicine - Wikipedia

The history of medicine shows how societies have changed in their approach to illness and disease from ancient times to the present. Early medical traditions include those of Babylon, China, Egypt and India. Sushruta, from India, introduced the concepts of medical diagnosis and prognosis. The Hippocratic Oath was written in […]

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